End of IBM Summit Internship

I never win those case competitions at school – but here is a competition I thought we had a fair chance at. We presented to the President of IBM last week and won first place.

I made the most of EVERY opportunity this internship had to offer. I wore a suit & tie every single day. I volunteered to run the blog and published 7 posts. I read Thomas Watson’s biography on my spare time. The video unintentionally went viral at work. I published an editorial for Talentegg.ca. I don’t drink, but I still showed up to every social.

When my manager said he was gonna go verbally spar with a corporate lawyer over a multi-million dollar negotiation, I asked if I could just come and listen and he let me. He called the lawyer a cruel baby-seal clubber and still won the deal. We laughed.

Anytime someone said “I’d be happy to help, just reach out” or “I think you should talk to this person” I did just that, and followed-up to meet for a chat. It didn’t matter if that person was another intern, a manager, or an executive. They were worth the time and I prepared so I was worth their time.

An internship is often like university. You are not remembered for all the things you do in class, you are remembered for all the things you do outside of class. Be outstanding.

I would not have done anything differently over those 15 weeks. I am returning back to the Ted Rogers School of Management – Ryerson University for two semesters and I’m done!

An Inspirational Video to Wrap Up The Journey

Over the past 6 months I taught myself how to use Adobe Premiere to create the video below. I couldn’t think of a better way to express the journey from Summer 2016 until now.

VIDEO URL: facebook.com/RyanIng/posts/101

People don’t believe me when I tell them it took 50 hours of editing. It really did. Every subtitle, is handmade, every photo resized, every effect, manually added in. Though I admit most of the time spent was learning how to use the software, and experimenting with concepts.

The many, many drafts involved in the process.

I reverse-engineered how to make a viral video from online tutorials and put many elements of that into the piece below. I sent it out to three people for feedback prior to release (thank you very much to Roxine Kee who reviewed both the first and second drafts) and took their feedback to improve the piece.

The result?

10,000 views within 24 hours. 

And to date: 23,000 views, 674 likes, and 132 shares.

The video was leaked to my workplace and received comment from the President of IBM Canada. The Dean of TRSM also left comment.

What I’m really proud about is all the shares. To create content that people feel like is worth talking about is a sure hallmark of success.

But anyway, the video speaks for itself. I am glad to capture this point of my life in a 4 minute video. You never know when it will come up in the future,

Persistence: Applying to IBM’s Summit Sales Program A Second Time

If I learned one thing from working in sales, it’s that persistence is key. Sometimes you are the right person, but simply are reaching out at the wrong time. You can’t give up on your first attempt.

I dedicate this photo to everyone who has applied to the same job twice.

Bonus points if the job website still has your old application on file, lol. Second time should be a charm as I am significantly more qualified (8 months of sales/marketing experience) than the last time.